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Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

4 edition of Glass from Quseir al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean trade found in the catalog.

Glass from Quseir al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean trade

by Carol Meyer

  • 178 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by Oriental Institute of The University of Chicago in Chicago, Ill .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Qusayr al-Qadīm (Extinct city),
  • Indian Ocean Region,
  • Egypt
    • Subjects:
    • Glass trade -- Indian Ocean Region -- History.,
    • Glass -- Egypt -- Qusayr al-Qadīm (Extinct city),
    • Qusayr al-Qadīm (Extinct city)

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. xv-xxvi) and index.

      StatementCarol Meyer.
      SeriesStudies in ancient oriental civilization ;, no. 53
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDT73.Q77 M49 1992
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxxvi, 201 p. :
      Number of Pages201
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1747171M
      ISBN 100918986877
      LC Control Number92061543

      Her study on Quseir al-Qadim has been described as showing "her ability to recount fascinating botanical investigations of the past in a stimulating and thorough way". Her recent work has focussed on the dispersal of imported plant foods, in Roman Britain, [12] and the Indian Ocean spice trade. The battle of Actium waged in 31 BC and the annexation of Egypt in 30 BC to the Roman Empire opened up avenues for increased commercial contact between the Roman Empire, South Asia in general and India in particular and the port of Muziris was the premier trading post of India. In this volume, eminent international scholars from the USA, Switzerland, United Kingdom, France, Italy as well as.

      Glass from Quseir Al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean Trade, Issue Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. p. 37 Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. p. 37 Tughtakin ibn Ayyub ( words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article. The Indian Ocean Trade Roman period trade Islamic period trade Quseir al-Qadim –Myos Hormos/Kusayr Data Collection and Methods Sampling strategy Identification Quantification and data presentation Preservation .

      Glass from Quseir Al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean trade. (Studies in Ancient Oriental Civilization, 53). Chicago: The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. Glass from Quseir Al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean Trade. Chicago: University of Chicago Press,


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Glass from Quseir al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean trade by Carol Meyer Download PDF EPUB FB2

Glass from Quseir al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean Trade (Studies in Ancient Oriental Civilization) Paperback – December 1, Cited by: 9. Glass from Quseir al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean Trade. SAOC Glass from Quseir al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean Trade.

This volume is the final report on the first and second century a.d. and thirteenth and fourteenth century Islamic glass excavated at Quseir al-Qadim on the Red Sea coast of Egypt. The report not only describes the glass. Glass from Quseir al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean trade.

[Carol Meyer] -- "This volume is the final report on the first and second century a.d. and thirteenth and fourteenth century Islamic glass excavated at Quseir al-Qadim on the Red Sea coast of Egypt.

Get this from a library. Glass from Quseir al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean trade. [Carol Meyer]. Glass from Quseir al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean Trade by Carol Meyer This volume is the final report on the first and second century a.d.

and thirteenth and fourteenth century Islamic glass excavated at Quseir al-Qadim on the Red Sea coast of Egypt. Glass from Quseir Al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean Trade Meyer, Carol; Published by The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL ().

Meyer, Glass from Quseir al Qadìm and the Indian Ocean Trade, Studies in Ancient Orientale Civilization 3, By Marie-Dominique Nenna Publisher: PERSÉE - ENS de Lyon. Quseir al-Qadim acted as a transhipment port in the Indian Ocean spice trade during both the Roman and medieval Islamic periods.

It is located on the Red Sea coast of Egypt and was active between ca. AD (Myos Hormos) and again during ca. AD (Kusayr). Studies of food and foodways are vital to exploring past (and present) cultures. The food remains discovered at the port of Quseir al-Qadim are especially revealing, offering important information about the ancient spice trade and the food practices of those engaged in this trade.

Quseir al-Qadim acted as a transhipment port in the Indian Ocean spice trade during both the Roman and medieval. The archaeological and numismatic evidence for Roman trade in the Indian Ocean from the Augustan annexation of Egypt up to the early third century ce shows that the most intense period of contact and exchange was in the late first century arguments presented here challenge two major positions, which assert either a peak during the Julio-Claudian period or a continuing intensity of.

Semi-precious stones, pearls, beads, and other items from Persia are declared in one of the documents found outside the Sheikh's House at Quseir al-Qadim (Guo, 40, 67, ). From the 1st century AD navigational manual known as the Periplus Maris Erythraei, we know that glass items were traded at the Red Sea ports (Casson, ).

Glass from Quseir al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean Trade. By CAROL MEYER. Studies in Ancient Oriental Civilization No. x mm. xxvi + Chicago, The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, ISBN 0 87 7. Price $ Many reports on archaeological glass confine themselves to one period, and concentrate firmly.

MEYER C, Glass from Quseir al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean trade, Chicago, Oriental Institute publication WHITCOMB- JOHNSON WHITCOMB D. and JOHNSON J., Quseir al-QadimPreliminary report, Cairo, American research Center in Egypt.

WHITCOMB-JOHNSON Whitcomb D. and Johnson J., «Quseir and the Red Sea Trade», Archaeology,   Abstract. Faced with a mounting economic crisis, the Mamluk sultan al-Ashraf Barsbāy (r.

) sought new sources of revenue from the commercial economy of the Red Sea port of Jedda, which was emerging in the 15th century as a hub for maritime trade between the Indian Ocean.

Carol Meyer - Glass from Quseir al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean Trade, Chicago, The Orienntal Institute of The University of Chicago, - на английски език, от The Chicago Oriental Institute, формат PDF, файлoвете не са архивирани. Сваляне с десен бутон (right bottom) и Save as.

Glass from Quseir Al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean Trade, Issue Oriental Institute of the University Oriental Institute of the University Ashtiname of Muhammad (2, words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article.

Glass from Quseir al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean Trade by Carol Meyer Glass from Quseir al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean Trade by Carol Meyer (pp. ) Review by: Susan H. Auth. Arikamedu (Fig. 2) was not only the birthplace of Indian Ocean archaeology, but it also became the point of departure for the renewed interest in the material evidence of Indian Ocean started with new studies of the material that was excavated but only partly published by Wheeler and Casal (Begley ; Begley et al.p.

7; Gupta ) and continued with new excavations. Studies in Ancient Oriental Civilization Series. The Book Of The Dead: Or, Going Forth By Day: Ideas Of The Ancient Egyptians Concerning The Hereafter As Expressed In Their Own Terms.

by Thomas George Allen. Glass from Quseir Al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean Trade. by Carol Meyer. The results of the first season of archaeological excavations at the small port site of Quseir al-Qadim on the Red Sea are presented in this volume.

Archaeological evidence testifies to the importance of this port, then called Leukos Limen, for the Roman trade in the Indian Ocean in the first and second centuries a.d. To date, no comprehensive treatment of Egyptian magic has focused on the practice of the magician.

Both general studies and textual publications have emphasized instead the religious elements in the contents of recited spells, while the accompanying instructions, with their vignettes and lists of materials, instruments, and ritual actions, remained uninvestigated.Archaeological evidence for the spice trade and the spices themselves was previously limited, but recently much new evidence has been generated through archaeological excavations at one of the key ports involved in the ancient and medieval Islamic Indian Ocean trade, Quseir al-Qadim, located on the Red Sea coast of Egypt, with further information generated by the excavations at Berenike.

Glass from Quseir al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean trade (Studies in ancient oriental civilization 53). Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. Review: Nicholson, P. T. (). ‘Glass from Quseir al-Qadim and the Indian Ocean trade – Meyer, C’, The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology – Whitcomb, D.

().